By: Jillian Stella, September 07, 2017 (11:22 AM)

Pastebin: Hackbait Oh Ha Ha

So, what can you find on Pastebin? Oh, you know, just a bunch of source code, internet relay chat, code review, “Hundreds of ISIS Accounts!” and “HBO LEAKS GAME OF THRONES EPISODE 71” (spoiler alert).

Pastebin – a media outlet for hackbait?

The founder of Pastebin created the site with a vision to simply share code online and in more than 140 characters.

Code sharing has a wide variety of benefits. For instance, imagine having to write your own website templates from scratch and rewrite new code for every single site that you generate.

Pastebin can provide developers and programmers with a sigh of relief – simply by surfing to their website, copying some HTML/CSS code and viola – within a few seconds, you’ve added a pink website background with a majestic unicorn theme :).

Yet, of course, everything good on the internet comes with some bad. As Pastebin’s site has helped developers, it has also been aiding hackers (unable of using proper netiquette) to share exploits (and thankfully, Game of Thrones episodes) at the speed of light. A quick search onto your local browser or a jump to Tor later and you can find yourself on such hackers’ breeding ground.

In short, the site has become a marketplace for stolen data.

Some of the greatest exploits we’re published through Pastebin. Remember hearing about that huge National Security Agency leak that happened back in August of last year? A hacking group known as the Shadow Brokers actually used Pastebin to release that confidential information and later, to spread WannaCry ransomware around the globe.

Such information presented the agencies hacking tools, Windows exploits, servers and a bunch of other secrets we could have already assumed that the NSA was hiding behind our backs – if you haven’t already, put a Band-Aid on your god damn webcam.

Now, you have either opened your glistening eyes to a generous portal of Game of Thrones leaks or have found yet another reason to disengage from the internet. In any case, make sure to copy and paste at your own risk.

Jillian Stella

Jillian Stella is a recent graduate from the University at Albany where she obtained a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Digital Forensics. Jillian is a Security Analyst and Researcher at Cursive Security where she works with and performs assessment and response services for clients. She is currently conducting research in the area of cyber threat intelligence.

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